Egyptian Symbols and Meanings

egyptian symbols and meanings

Egyptian Symbols and Meanings

(Last Updated On: June 13, 2022)

Everything You Need to Know About Egyptian Symbols and Meanings

Since the ancient Egyptians ruled thousands of years ago, their symbols and meanings have been lost in translation from generation to generation. Many younger Egyptians don’t know why certain symbols are used or even exist! This guide aims to show you everything there is to know about Egyptian symbols and meanings so that you can bring this beautiful part of your culture back into the spotlight!

1. Eye Of Horus

Horus was one of ancient Egypt’s most important gods. The son of Osiris, he was known as a god of war, protection, and fertility. He also represented royal power and strength. Often depicted as a falcon or with eyes on his head, Horus had many symbols that represented his roles in ancient Egyptian society. One such symbol is called the Eye of Horus. This symbol holds special meaning for Egyptians, but what does it mean?

Here are some facts about Egyptian culture and history to help you understand everything you need to know about Egyptian symbols and meanings. The eye of Horus can be found throughout ancient Egypt, from temple walls to jewelry worn by pharaohs and commoners alike. As early as 3000 B.C., people wore amulets depicting the eye of Horus (also known as wedjat) to promote healing, health, and good luck.

2. Knot Of Isis

The Knot of Isis is one of many Egyptian symbols that’s always been interesting. The meaning behind it will help you understand why it was so significant—and how Egyptologists think we ought to interpret it. I believe that by understanding what Egyptian culture means for us today, we can create a new understanding of how we live in our own culture. Understanding all facets of human culture is essential, whether you are looking into different cultures or different historical moments from one culture.

3. Udjat Eye

The most famous and familiar of all Egyptian symbols, it was carved into temple walls, onto statues, amulets, and more. The Udjat Eye symbolizes protection, health, and good luck. It’s also thought to represent wisdom. One of its meanings is protecting against evil, or evil is not before me. Egyptian pharaohs wore an Udjat Eye on their crowns to signify that they were divinely protected by Ra. This symbol has been around for thousands of years, making it one of the oldest.

strength power egyptian symbols

4. Feather Of Maat

This feather was called Ma’at, a scale that measured good against evil. Thoth, one of Egypt’s most important gods, carried it around like a scepter in his hand. With it, he could accurately weigh people’s hearts after they died. If their heart weighed more than the feather, then their soul would be devoured by Ammit—the nasty-looking crocodile-like goddess who crouched at one end of Anubis’ scales. The ancient Egyptians believed that if your heart was lighter than Ma’at’s feather, you were worthy of entering into heaven (known as The Field of Reeds).

The ankh symbolized life and immortality because it represented a key—one used to unlock doors. In Egyptian mythology, life after death is just like life before the end: there are many obstacles to overcome along the way. Only those with an ankh can unlock all of these doors and find their way into heaven.

5. Was Scepter

The scepter is a rod or staff that a person holds in one hand, usually on top of their head. It’s also known as a staff of power or a stick. In ancient Egypt, pharaohs would hold it above their heads when giving speeches to their people. Today, scepters are most often associated with monarchs, royalty, judges, and those in positions of high authority; The Pope uses one too.

However, if you look at some of history’s most outstanding leaders—such as Mahatma Gandhi—you might notice that they didn’t have a scepter but instead held something else: an open palm. This symbolizes peace and harmony. Gandhi thought that keeping an open palm was more powerful than having a closed fist—he believed that by extending his hand outward, he could show others his desire for peace without resorting to violence.

seba egyptian symbols

6. Djed Pillar

The Djed pillar, which symbolizes stability and endurance, represents physical strength and mental health. It also indicates a person’s ability to achieve their goals despite challenges they may face. The Djed symbol is frequently found in hieroglyphs alongside the Tyet, commonly known as the Isis knot or girdle.

An ankh or DJed pendant is often given as a gift to people who are recovering from surgery or illness. Some people believe that wearing an ankh or carrying one on them at all times will protect them from harm and ward off evil spirits. Egyptian pharaohs often wore an ankh in hieroglyphics depicting their rule over Egypt as a sign of authority.

Ancient Egyptians believed that humans have five primary senses: sight, smell, taste, touch, and hearing. The head symbolizes these senses because it houses them. In ancient Egypt, a human head represented wisdom, intellect, and knowledge. It is also associated with justice due to its symbolism of keeping track of good deeds done on earth while a person was alive. Ancient Egyptians also believe that an afterlife awaits humans after death. Do you want to know what is the official language of Egypt?

7. Ankh

The Ankh symbol is an ancient Egyptian symbol that represents life and immortality. The Ankh is often depicted in hieroglyphics and artworks and is a famous symbol in jewelry and tattoos. The Ankh is a powerful symbol of life and immortality and is a popular choice for those seeking a tattoo or piece of jewelry with a profound meaning. It is often seen in Egyptian art and architecture and has been used by many people throughout history to symbolize life and fertility.

The Ankh has three main parts: the loop, the cross, and the handle. Each piece of the Ankh has its meaning and symbolism. The circle of the Ankh symbolizes the eternal cycle of life/eternal life, death, and rebirth. The cross represents the four elements of earth, air, fire, and water.

The handle of the Ankh represents the hand of God, which is said to give life and immortality. The Ankh is a powerful symbol that has been used throughout history to describe life, fertility, and immortality. It symbolizes hope and life and reminds us that life is a never-ending cycle.

8. Ouroboros

The Ouroboros is an ancient symbol that has been used throughout history to represent the cycle of life and death, as well as the concept of rebirth. This symbol can be found in various cultures and religions, and it continues to be used today to represent the cyclical nature of life. The Ouroboros is a powerful symbol that can remind us of the importance of living each moment to the fullest and appreciating the cycle of life.

In Greek mythology, the Ouroboros represented the serpent eating his tail. He was considered a symbol of eternity and regeneration. In Chinese culture, the Ouroborus means the dragon is swallowing its tail. The Ouroborous snake is a symbol of eternity and rebirth. Its shape resembles the spiral pattern of DNA. This symbol is commonly found in Egyptian artwork and architecture. It is also a famous symbol among alchemists and philosophers. The Ouroboros is a symbol of eternity. It is a perfect example of a circle within a square. This symbol is commonly found in Hinduism. It represents the endless cycle of time and reincarnation.

9. Amenta

Amenta was the ancient Egyptian underworld, also known as the “land of the dead.” It was a dark and lonely place where the souls of the deceased were said to reside. The underworld was ruled by the god Osiris, and it was his task to judge the souls of the dead. Amenta was also the place where the sunset each night, and it was said to be guarded by the monster Ammit.

In ancient Egyptian mythology, Amenta is the land of the dead. It is a dark and gloomy place, ruled by the god Osiris. The souls of the deadly journey to Amenta after death, where they must stand trial before the gods. If they are found guilty, they are cast into the underworld.

10. Scarab

The scarab symbol was prevalent in ancient Egypt, and it represented transformation. The scarab beetle would lay its eggs in a ball of dung, transforming into a new beetle. This symbolized the process of death and rebirth, which was very important to the ancient Egyptians. The scarab symbol was often used in funerary contexts, as it was thought to be helpful in the afterlife. For example, scarab amulets were usually placed in tombs and coffins. They were also used as seals, which would help the deceased to pass through the underworld.

The scarab symbol was also associated with the god Khepri. Khepri was the god of the rising sun, and he was often depicted as a scarab beetle. The scarab beetle would roll the sun up into the sky each morning. The scarab symbol was also used as a personal amulet. This was because it was thought to have magical powers and could protect the wearer from harm. Scarab amulets were often made from various materials, including stone, faience, and glass.

11. Tyet

The Tyet, also known as the Knot of Isis or the key of life, is an ancient Egyptian symbol representing the goddess Isis and her power. The Tyet is often seen as a symbol of feminism, as it represents the strength and power of the female divine. The Tyet is also a symbol of protection, as it was believed to offer protection to the wearer from harm.

The Tyet is a powerful symbol of the goddess Isis and her feminine power. Isis was the goddess of motherhood, fertility, and magic and was one of the most important deities in the Egyptian pantheon. The Tyet represents the power of the goddess to create and protect life. Isis was a protector of the weak and oppressed, and the Tyet symbolizes her strength and compassion.

The Tyet is also a symbol of protection. It was believed that the goddess Isis would protect those who wore the sign from harm. The Tyet was often used as a talisman or amulet and was thought to offer protection from disease, evil spirits, and bad luck. The Tyet was also used as a symbol of healing and was supposed to have the power to heal the sick and injured.

The Tyet is an essential symbol of feminism and female empowerment. The symbol represents the strength and power of the female divine. The Tyet reminds us that women are strong and capable of great things. The Tyet symbolizes hope and possibility and is a reminder that women can achieve anything they set their minds to.

12. Ba

The Ba symbol is an ancient Egyptian hieroglyph representing the physical soul and rebirth. This symbol was often used in funerary texts and tomb paintings to help guide the deceased’s soul to the afterlife. The Ba was thought to be a bird-like creature that would fly to the sun god Ra each night and bring him back to life each morning.

The Ba symbol has a long and rich history dating back to the early days of Egyptian civilization. The first known use of the symbol was in the Pyramid Texts, which are a collection of ancient Egyptian religious texts that date back to the Old Kingdom period. The Ba symbol was often used in funerary texts and tomb paintings.

The Ba symbol represents the physical soul of the deceased. This symbol was thought to help guide the soul to the afterlife. The Ba was often depicted as a bird-like creature that would fly to the sun god Ra each night and bring him back to life each morning. The Ba symbol was of great significance in ancient Egyptian culture. This symbol was thought to help the deceased’s soul reach the afterlife. The Ba was also a symbol of rebirth and regeneration.

egyptian symbol of death

13. Hedjet

The ancient Egyptian symbol of Hedjet represented the Kingdom of Upper Egypt. This sacred icon was worn by the Pharaohs and was believed to have magical powers. The three main points of this essay will discuss the meaning behind Hedjet, the different ways it was used, and its significance in ancient Egyptian culture.

Hedjet was more than just a symbol of the Kingdom of Upper Egypt; it was a sacred icon believed to have magical powers. The Pharaohs would wear Hedjet as a crown, and it was also used in funerary rites. The white color of Hedjet represented purity and was associated with the goddess Isis.

There were many different ways that Hedjet was used. As mentioned before, it was often worn by the Pharaohs as a crown. It was also used in funerary rites, which would be placed on the deceased’s mummy. Hedjet was also used as a symbol of power and authority. Hedjet was a significant symbol in ancient Egyptian culture.

14. Uraeus

The uraeus is a sacred symbol of ancient Egypt that represents the power of the gods and pharaohs. This symbol was often worn by Egyptian royalty to signify their divine authority. The uraeus was also used as a protective charm against evil forces. The uraeus was typically depicted as a cobra, a symbol of royalty and power in ancient Egypt. The cobra was also associated with the sun god Ra, one of the most important deities in the Egyptian pantheon. The uraeus was a potent symbol of divine authority and power, and it was used to protect the pharaohs from harm. This symbol reminded us that the pharaohs were chosen by the gods to rule over Egypt.

egypt symbols

15. Canopic Jars

Canopic jars were used in Ancient Egyptian mummification rituals and were thought to protect the body or internal organs and soul of the deceased. There were four jars, each associated with a different god or goddess. The jars were traditionally made of limestone or alabaster and were often decorated with the head of the god or goddess they represented.

The first canopic jar was associated with the god Qebehsenuef and was thought to protect the deceased’s intestines. The second jar was associated with the goddess Duamutef and was thought to protect the stomach. The third jar was associated with the god Hapy and was supposed to protect the lungs. The fourth and final jar was associated with the goddess Isis and was supposed to protect the heart.

Canopic jars were an essential part of the mummification process and were often placed in tombs alongside the mummy. They were thought to protect the body and soul of the deceased and help them transition into the afterlife. Canopic jars were often made of limestone or alabaster and were often decorated with the head of the god or goddess they represented. They were an essential part of Ancient Egyptian culture and religion and were used in many burial rituals.

FAQ’s

What are the most famous Ancient Egyptian symbols for Healing?

The ancient Egyptians were a highly advanced society with a rich culture that included art, music, religion, and science. They were also masters of healing and used a variety of symbols to promote health and well-being. Some of the most famous ancient Egyptian symbols for healing include the Eye of Horus, the Ankh, and the Scarab Beetle.

Is it okay to wear an ankh symbol?

The ankh is a symbol of life that originated in ancient Egypt. It is often seen worn as a necklace or pendant, and many people believe that it has special powers. Some say that the ankh represents the key to the Nile, while others believe that it is a symbol of the sun. It’s a unisex symbol and can be worn by anyone.

What does the uraeus symbolize?

In ancient Egypt, the uraeus was a symbol of royalty and power. The uraeus was worn on the headdress of the pharaohs, and it represented their authority and power. The uraeus was also a symbol of protection, and it was thought to protect the pharaoh from evil.

What does the feather of Maat mean?

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